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Recovery Strap, Etc. Suggestions

Discussion in 'The Tool Shed' started by mickeykelley, Sep 20, 2018.

  1. Sep 20, 2018
    mickeykelley

    mickeykelley Well-Known Member

    Republic of Texas
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    I'm slowly building up my jeep accessories and now is strap time. What are the suggestions in terms of pound rating, length, brand, etc. I also will need a tree strap and 6 foot seems to be number, but again rating, brand, etc. As for shackles, I plan to just keep 2 mounted on the front bumper and they could easily be moved to the rear if needed. But I'm thinking I should keep a spare or spare pair. Thoughts? Again ratings, brands, etc. All input is appreciated.
     
  2. Sep 20, 2018
    tarry99

    tarry99 Member

    Northern California
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    Keep in mind most times your going to tug on something or get tugged were talking rolling weight.......and not dead weight , so in the interest of saving space , you don't need these huge 3" straps .....I also like to carry a 20' length of cable with hooks on both ends as well as 10' +/- of 3/8" proof chain with hooks.......tree straps are great...........on shackles always nice to have a few extra to add length to what you have and most important......is your bumper and attachment points in as much as how strong they are as it will get a real test if you ever get stuck or you ever try to pull some one out..........I've seen plenty of bumpers and hooks pulled off of rigs during recoverys. .................Do you have a winch?
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2018
  3. Sep 20, 2018
    FinoCJ

    FinoCJ 1970 CJ5 Staff Member 2020 Sponsor

    Denver, CO
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    I seem to use the 20k lbs straps - maybe because they are common. I figure most of our jeeps run an 8000lbs winch or so, and sometimes we double the cable back using a pulley for twice the pulling - so 16,000lbs. If I am anchoring that pulley with a single strap end (rare but sometimes the full length is needed), then 20,000lbs gives some margin. Most of the time, I am anchoring the winch cable to the strap that is wrapped around an anchor (tree) and attach the winch to both ends of the strap - so 20,000 is overkill for most situations. One other thing to remember - when out wheeling with other people, they may not have relatively light jeeps and your recovery gear often ends up pulling out a sky high 3/4 ton truck that couldn't drive over something you barely noticed in your jeep...so its good to have gear that has plenty of margin for your jeep and can be used to help other with bigger vehicles. (I have a friend with a H1 - its quite entertaining to wheel our vehicles together - I always joke that he is on his own when it comes to recovery, and that I will not try to pull him out of anything!)

    FWIW - I have my 8k winch with 100' cable, a 30' 20k strap, a 10k chain (I think its 50' - its great for attaching to vehicle frames that don't have good recovery point to save your straps from damage), and a pulley (really helps my little jeep winch pull something a lot bigger). I would like to add an elastic recovery strap to my collection for special scenarios - but it is not to replace a normal, non-elastic tow strap. I don't carry a tree strap (although I wouldn't mind one), and just use my 30'. I also carry two 3/4" shackles for various connections (not counting the ones on my jeep bumper/frame). I keep all my recovery gear (and bottle jack and tire iron) in the tool box under the seat. Spare parts and tools go in my back seat cargo area (lock box).
     
  4. Sep 20, 2018
    Danefraz

    Danefraz Well-Known Member 2019 Sponsor

    Chico CA
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    I'd toss in another short length of chain if you have it, or an old moving blanket. Something to put over the cable if you're pulling that keeps the 'recoil' down low if it breaks under tension and comes shooting back or snaps forward.
     
    heavychevy likes this.
  5. Sep 20, 2018
    jeepermc

    jeepermc Member

    Western WA
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    Straps should be sized for the weight of your vehicle. A true "recovery strap" i.e. Kinetic strap needs to be appropriate for the weight of your rig. You don't need the biggest baddest strap you can find. It won't stretch effectively to pull you out. I prefer ARB straps. They make a variety of recovery straps, and even two different lengths of tree straps. They also make shackles rated for whatever you want for the most part, but remember, never join two straps with a shackle. If one were to fail, it turns into a slingshot with a heavy metal piece attached to one end. These things will go thru seats, tailgates, windshields, your head, etc. Always practice safe recovery.

    The ARB705 would be plenty for any of our jeeps. Recovery Gear

    And these shackles- ARB Recovery Shackle 4.75T, 10,471lb (ARB2014)
     
    heavychevy likes this.
  6. Sep 20, 2018
    Warloch

    Warloch Did you say Flattie??? Staff Member

    Falcon, CO
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    Not sure about others, but the 6' tree strap I have is to short about 80% of the time so I end up using a 15' with a shackle to tie to.
     
    Danefraz likes this.
  7. Sep 20, 2018
    tarry99

    tarry99 Member

    Northern California
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    20,000 lb straps?.................Keep in mind if your vehicle weighs 3500 lbs and your going tug on something that exceeds your weight by 2 times............it ain't happening.........even with a winch , unless you tie the backend off to a tree.........and even then if you snatch block it you can only move what the winch , hooks & cable is rated for........that's why rolling weight vs dead weight ( or stuck in the mud weight are two different animals) ...............and if you have never seen a vehicle being pulled apart when tied off in the back or hooked to a few other vehicles it's quite interesting...........the old adage of never picking on something larger than you holds true here.........
     
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  8. Sep 20, 2018
    FinoCJ

    FinoCJ 1970 CJ5 Staff Member 2020 Sponsor

    Denver, CO
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    true - and in my case the shackle is the weak spot at 10,000lbs. With a snatch block you reduce the load on the winch by half but the tension in the cable stays the same - so an 8,000lbs winch can pull an object with 16,000lbs (obviously we are talking ideal max conditions not too mention that winches loose significant pulling power as the cable wraps around the drum increase etc etc), but cable could become overloaded. I should check my cable rating. And whether a small jeep can ever be anchored and survive such a pull - no probably not - I honestly don't get too involved with pulling other vehicles out as its tough on my little jeep and others might as well put there new fancy expensive equipment to use. But, some of those big trucks have 12-15k winches and then need to borrow my strap to anchor to a tree - and a lot of other recovery gear often gets borrowed by others - so I like to have some gear that can be used for any situation and by other vehicles, and not just by or for my relatively light jeep. And the 20k straps are the common cheap ones around here at the local FLAPS - easily replaced as they tend to walk away during recovery operations etc.
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2018
  9. Sep 20, 2018
    tarry99

    tarry99 Member

    Northern California
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    Yes and No............the snatch block should be rated for double the weight the first cable can pull..........as well as all the attachment points on your winch including bumper bolts that also need to be doubled if your bringing the loose cable end back to your vehicle.........that's why some of us tie off the loose cable end to a tree to lesson the impact on the pulling vehicle..........which brings us to the most important part of any recovery especially one that your considering using a snatch block and that is setting up the number of pulls based on the severity of the recovery........sometimes it may be beneficial to do 1 or two short pulls to get the vehicle in a better position for the final pull out..........
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2018
    Danefraz likes this.
  10. Sep 20, 2018
    FinoCJ

    FinoCJ 1970 CJ5 Staff Member 2020 Sponsor

    Denver, CO
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    just after posting I realized my mistake in terms of cable tension...has been edited
     
  11. Sep 20, 2018
    FinoCJ

    FinoCJ 1970 CJ5 Staff Member 2020 Sponsor

    Denver, CO
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    Since the OPs question was regarding recovery gear - what do you think is the appropriate strap rating? I agree that 20k is overkill for all but the most unique situation (and as you have described, other components may not be up to the task then either), and generally I think 8-10k lbs would be fine as many of us use a winch in that range. But at least when I was looking, most FLAPS I have mostly carry the 2.5" 20k in store. Guessing if you are ordering online, you can probably find some 1-2"" 8-10k straps and they are probably a bit cheaper.
     
  12. Sep 20, 2018
    Mcruff

    Mcruff Earlycj5 Machinist

    Albertville, AL
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    Yea if your using a 10,000lb Clevis, the Clevis is not the the weak point in this equation. The early 5 frame is. Most clevis’s are actually rated at 50% of there breaking point. Your frame will rip apart before that. Friend did that on his 64, pulled the arches out of both ends and ripped the rivets and welds where his springs were attached. Clevis held fine.
     
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  13. Sep 20, 2018
    mickeykelley

    mickeykelley Well-Known Member

    Republic of Texas
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    I guess I need to provide more information and clarification. Yes there will be a PTO winch once I get it all mounted. We don't really plan to do exotic stuff. The wife and I just looking to do forest roads to see scenery, etc. Laid back stuff like the Fall Colors Tour folks on the 2a site. Go camping. I don't plan on going rock climbing, mudding, etc. Presumably will cross some creeks, but not anything deep, be in snow, maybe some sand, etc. A year+ ago while looking at some property in CO, I got our 4X Avalanche stuck in a slick, muddy, boggy area and had to get a pull. It didn't look boggy until I spun and sank and yes it still had factory style tires. So it made me realize I need to carry certain items should I be out in the woods and get stuck. Things like shovel, straps, etc. So what I was really asking is recommendations for specs and decent, yet affordable, brands. So I'm guessing a 20,000 lb is enough. Not the HF 9,000? A 10,000 lbs shackle is ok or 20 is better? That kind of suggestions. Hopefully I will never need it, but best to be prepared, whether out on our own or with others. I've also been reading the thread on what tools and parts, but this is just trying to get handle on this part.
     
  14. Sep 21, 2018
    Mcruff

    Mcruff Earlycj5 Machinist

    Albertville, AL
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    For a normal Jeep a 7500lb to 10,000 Clevis is all you need, go to McMaster Carr and buy a alloy steel galvanized one for around $22-$25, made in USA. There is no real reason on a Jeep to have a winch bigger than 9,000lbs, you could get away with a 6,000lb unit. The old saying was 1-1/2 times the weight of the normal Jeep weight.
     
  15. Sep 21, 2018
    Sierra Bum

    Sierra Bum Member

    The High Sierra
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    Considering the proper ratings, I'd suggest a couple tree straps (8' or so), a 20-30' tow strap, 4 shackles and a snatch block. This will get you out of almost every situation and will even give you the ability to rig a directional pull. A tow strap can also be used as a tree saver if need be. Take a look at the newer synthetic winch lines and winch line extensions (Amsteel). They are lighter and stronger than wire rope/cable, and perhaps more versatile.
     
  16. Sep 21, 2018
    montanacj

    montanacj Member

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  17. Sep 21, 2018
    jeepermc

    jeepermc Member

    Western WA
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    Most cheap D shackles have a safety margin of about 4:1 based on the Working Load Limit (WLL). Some of the more expensive ones go to a 6:1 ratio. So in reality, the potential failure point of most 10k shackles is around 40k, some as high as 60k. The shackle will not likely be your failure point.

    Straps- for a static pull, rolling load, a small 1-2" 8k rated strap would be fine. If you're trying to recover a rolled or wrecked vehicle this would also be fine in some situations, but you should be using it in conjunction with a winch. For a "stuck recovery", you would want a larger rated strap. The forces induced by a dynamic pull (assuming you have a proper strap that will stretch) can be far greater than the weight of the pulling vehicle. You can also use this method to "unstick" a larger vehicle with a smaller one within reason, assuming all your attachment points and equipment are in good shape.

    Soft shackles are cool. I have several. They work really well in most situations to mitigate a potential heavy flying object coming at someone in the event of an equipment failure.
     
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  18. Sep 22, 2018
    Keys5a

    Keys5a Sponsor

    Florida Keys
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    I used to make monthly gas money pulling out much larger vehicles when I lived op on the NC Outer Banks. I drove a VW Baja bug, and numerous times pulled larger vehicles, up to the size of full size pickups, out when they were stuck in deep sand. I would lower their tire pressures (the reason they got stuck!), dig out around the tires and under the chassis, and had a very stretchy 2 1/2" sling about 25' long. When they were ready, I would back up to about 8' from them and take off. The sling would take up like a rubber band and almost always move them forward and out of the hole they dug.
    -Donny
     
  19. Sep 23, 2018
    nickmil

    nickmil In mothballs.

    Happy Valley, OR
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    This.
     
  20. Sep 24, 2018
    Tumbleweed

    Tumbleweed Senior member

    Mtn. Home, Idaho
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    If you have to connect two straps together, place a stick or dowel about the size of your thumb in between the loops. You will be able to work the loops apart that way, and it does not become a projectile. Floor mats work good for on a strap or line to keep it from flying as bad. The idea is not to weigh the line down, but to give the line something to tangle around and fall to the ground. I use a couple of 2" x 20' straps. Also carry a 4' length of 5/16 chain with two hooks for attaching to rigs that don't have suitable attachment points. Saves cutting a strap usually. One thing for sure you will learn, if you tie a knot in a strap-you will never get it apart again.
     

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