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Blalp!’s Build/project (‘64 Cj5)

Discussion in 'Builds and Fabricators Forum' started by blalp!, Mar 1, 2020.

  1. May 7, 2023
    Buildflycrash

    Buildflycrash More or Less in Line. 2024 Sponsor 2022 Sponsor

    Gulf Breeze FL...
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2007
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    3,719
    Blalp- are you familiar with this “tie rod flip”?
    You’d probably flip your drag link but the process is pretty simple. I had a similar problem and just did the draglink on one of my Jeeps.
     
    blalp! likes this.
  2. May 7, 2023
    Rich M.

    Rich M. Shoe salesman 2024 Sponsor 2023 Sponsor 2022 Sponsor

    Maryland
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    Mar 23, 2008
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    2,259
    There's enough meat to the pitman arm just ream from the top, use a flange nut and locktite on the bottom. Goferit is out of business. A 2 hole knuckle for the passenger side would also improve things you could do a complete tie rod, draglink flip.
     
    vtxtasy and blalp! like this.
  3. May 7, 2023
    vtxtasy

    vtxtasy oldbee 2024 Sponsor 2023 Sponsor

    Tucson, AZ
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    Feb 5, 2006
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    1,501
    That would be a good improvement and much easier than relocating the steering box mount. It also keeps the shorter pitman arm.
     
    blalp! likes this.
  4. May 31, 2023
    blalp!

    blalp! Member 2024 Sponsor 2023 Sponsor 2022 Sponsor

    Concord, NH
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2019
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    237
    [​IMG]
    After much thought, opted to move the steering box ahead 3”. I made what was the front lower mounting point into the rear lower point. I then added two new front mounts (upper and lower). Next, an inch was cut out of the long tie rod and tapped just over an additional inch. Now the tie rod and drag link are positioned correctly and don’t interfere with each other. After setting the toe, a test drive that became a few hours long was a success!
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2023
  5. Sep 16, 2023
    blalp!

    blalp! Member 2024 Sponsor 2023 Sponsor 2022 Sponsor

    Concord, NH
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2019
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    237
    I was excited to get the 4 speed installed and just couldn’t wait until winter.

    I got up early one July morning and said “Stay focused on the outcome and get it done!”. Well, that was a mistake. The two bottom holes of the GM NP435 were threaded. I made the quick decision to drill out the threads, as apposed to bolting from inside the bellhousing. OOPS! That was a mistake that cost me the rest of the day.
    [​IMG]

    After a few minutes, I realized studs were needed. Both the hardware store and I didn’t have exactly what I needed, so I had to make them. This was my first attempt at a threading operation on the lathe. It would have gone a lot faster if I had a threading dial. After about an hour I had this.
    [​IMG]

    What the stud looks like in the transmission. The studs were installed in the bellhousing first. Then nutted on a little at a time from side to side until tight.
    [​IMG]

    The crossmember was inspired by Norcal69. This was my take on it after a quick consult with him. The trans mount holes are sleeved. The crossmember to frame bolts are recessed. The drivers side angle is a bit steeper to make room for future uses (PTO winch and/or two into one exhaust)
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    After a couple weeks, I was finally at a point that I could test drive it. While it’s a hard pull out of 1st, all the synchro gears shift very nicely. The narrow ratio is exactly as I had hoped, and is much better than the T14. While on my test drive I gave the chassis a good undercoating, by leaving a bolt out of the transfercase. Thought it was a blind hole, but I was wrong. Drained what was left of the oil, no metal flakes, refilled, and drove. Seems okay.
    [​IMG]

    The tunnel cover is still in the works. Trying to improve throttle pedal comfort at the same time. Moving the seat back 3” wasn’t quite enough.
     
  6. Jan 13, 2024
    blalp!

    blalp! Member 2024 Sponsor 2023 Sponsor 2022 Sponsor

    Concord, NH
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2019
    Messages:
    237
    Slowly and not steadily making headway on the fuel injection. This is based on (and with the help of) Norcal69’s design.

    [​IMG]
    Starting to install home made crank triggers.


    [​IMG]
    Here is the steel portion of the crank sensor bracket.

    The O2 sensor bung has been welded and sensor installed in exhaust header.

    Next will be fuel lines and fuel pump.
     
  7. Mar 24, 2024
    blalp!

    blalp! Member 2024 Sponsor 2023 Sponsor 2022 Sponsor

    Concord, NH
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2019
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    237
    A customer asked us to get dispose of this. I saw it and thought “that could become a spare tire carrier”. Nice latching mechanism with an anti-rattle tensioner, and a hold-open pin on the hinge. I may even be able to straighten the basket and incorporate it elsewhere in the Jeep. I’m a bit excited. Just need to figure a way to mount it to the frame and add a trailer hitch.
     
  8. Mar 28, 2024
    compostwerks

    compostwerks Sponsor

    Canterbury, NH
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2011
    Messages:
    605
    Could be very useful Shaun. That basket would fit nicely on top of a half cab, wink-wink....
     
    blalp! and dozerjim like this.
  9. Apr 28, 2024
    blalp!

    blalp! Member 2024 Sponsor 2023 Sponsor 2022 Sponsor

    Concord, NH
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2019
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    237
    In an attempt to create a comfortable throttle pedal (without being underneath the brake pedal), I purchased a set of hanging pedals from a CJ7. However, I wasn’t ready to close off the heater plenum. Back to fixing the dual reservoir pedals that were very loose. After seeing Compostwerks’ NOS parts, I decided to experiment. I ordered a NOS (single reservoir) brake pedal arm and pedal cross shaft frame bracket, as well as, a quality reproduction cross shaft. While the single and dual reservoir pedal arms aren’t the same, they can be made to work with the help of a bushing.

    The bend is about half an inch different from center to center.
    Yes, the bolts I had on hand are a bit too long.

    Seen here; The NOS military cross shaft bracket is a half inch narrower than the dual res bracket.

    This afternoon I cut down a 5/8” bolt and drilled a 7/16” hole in the middle to make a bushing to adapt the new pedal arm to the dual reservoir.

    After months of slowing picking away at this project, we now have a working set of pedals that have almost no play (compared to what was about an inch of play side to side). My shoe should no longer hit both the throttle and brake pedals at the same time.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2024
    Jw60, Fireball, Andrew Theros and 2 others like this.
  10. Apr 29, 2024
    compostwerks

    compostwerks Sponsor

    Canterbury, NH
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    Jan 1, 2011
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    That should be a big improvement Shaun. I remembered the old configuration and it wasn't that user friendly.
     
    blalp! likes this.
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