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Help with paint

Discussion in 'Early Jeep Restoration and Research' started by JZ, Jan 13, 2005.

  1. Jan 13, 2005
    JZ

    JZ Member

    Huntsville...
    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2004
    Messages:
    140
    I would like help on two paint issues,

    (1) Specific (original) color on my 1959 CJ5. looks like a medium, mettalic green to me. (No color tag on firewall, color is original from single layer behind dash) I have seen pages of chips on the web that have a color called Glenwood Green, but there are at least two other greens in this year range that could be... I know that the web cannot be trusted for colors, but I figure that 45 years of sun bleaching cannot be much worse...

    (2) If i wish to "paint at home", what am I up against? Almost a complete novice, I am concerned with the warnings posted on some auto restoration sites that claim that "modern paints use killer chemicals, leave it to the pros". Is the Beachwood "Emerald Green" paint any safer?
     
  2. Jan 13, 2005
    Glenn

    Glenn Kinda grumpy old man Staff Member Sponsor

    Apopka, Fl
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    Sep 21, 2002
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    9,235
  3. Jan 13, 2005
    JZ

    JZ Member

    Huntsville...
    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2004
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    140
    Glenn:

    That is the site that has my curiousity up. Those two are close. How do either compare with the Glenwood Emerald Green or my old paint?
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Jan 13, 2005
    CT

    CT Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2004
    Messages:
    238
    I am not a professional auto paint man. However I painted my 56 Willy’s with the original “Comet Blue” color paint. I went to my local ABC auto parts paint store, and they called a color lab who interned looked it up and gave them the formula.


    They had several grades of paint they could mix it in. I opted for a cheaper base coat. It was $56 per gallon. This along with the hardener and reducer kept my price to about $85.00 I used the recommend method of mixing in a hardener, and was extremely pleased with barn painting results. This is the 3 rd jeep I have done. It gets easier each time. And I would put mine up against a MECCO paint job any day.

    Call any of the auto shops and see where they mix their paint. They should be able to get you the same color.



    I know you didn’t ask, just wanted to offer a couple of quick painting tips. I remove my hood, fenders and grill and paint them separately. That way it is easier to paint the fire wall and the inside of the fenders. A quick and easy masking method for the motor and any other parts you do not want to paint is to use aluminum foil. I also painted my gear shifts and steering column gloss black before painting the jeep. I also covered them with foil. This is an old trick I learned from my antique tractor friends.
     
  5. Jan 13, 2005
    scott milliner

    scott milliner Master Fabricator

    Seattle Wa.
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    Dec 17, 2002
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    2,016
    Watch out people don't like the fumes. If the EPA find out they will fine you big time. :shock:
     
  6. Jan 14, 2005
    Glenn

    Glenn Kinda grumpy old man Staff Member Sponsor

    Apopka, Fl
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    Sep 21, 2002
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    Personally I think you have the Glenwood green on your grill.
     
  7. Jan 14, 2005
    Old Bill

    Old Bill Aggressively passive....

    Really Southern...
    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2004
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    First, you'll need to be prepared. Besides the necessities like paint, tape, air compressor, etc. you'll also need GOOD protection. Purchase a good respirator, don't scrimp, spend the cash on a quality unit. (Lung transplants ain't cheap ya know ;) ). Get a couple of the throw away jump suits, or at least round up some old long pants and shirts. You might even consider a cheap shower cap. (I had overspray in my hair for a few days making it difficult to comb my hair...ouch!) If you get a good respirator, and make sure you have adequate ventilation in your "booth", you'll be fine. If you start smelling the paint through the mask, take a break, get some fresh air, and let the booth vent out for a few minutes. It's really just common sense.

    Secondly, you'll need to prep the place. I used some PVC to make a "box", and clipped on some painter's plastic to make a booth of sorts. I used 2 box fans, one blowing in, and one out, with filters on them to cut out the overspray to the outside. I'd do it like this again if I'm ever in the situation. I've talked to people who kept finding overspray months and years after their project was done because they didn't do this. The plastic keeps it all in one place, and you can throw it away when you're done.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Last, do some research. You're already doing that, but read everything you can, have a plan, know exactly what you're going to do, and what order you're going to do it. It's not as difficult as you might think, you just have to do the learning first. Take your time, and you'll be OK.

    Check http://www.autobody101.com/ for some good forums to read up on.

    HTH
     
  8. Jan 14, 2005
    michigan_pinstripes

    michigan_pinstripes I'm not lost, I'm wandering Sponsor

    Clarkston MI...
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2003
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    606
    Boy... First time painting :shock:

    I have painted many cars and it is like riding a bicycle to me. The body movements are permanently encoded. I learned on laquer which you can screw up as much as you want and it is sandable ("20 coats of hand sanded laquer" :rofl: ). Laquer is pretty much long gone now.

    It's really not that hard but I would suggest getting a junkyard hood and practice first both vertical and horizontally. You'll get the idea.
     
  9. Jan 14, 2005
    JZ

    JZ Member

    Huntsville...
    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2004
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    Great tips. I have been hunting on the internet for "home paint booth" and this is the best description that I have seen yet. I am off the frame now so the hood, grill, fenders, windshield, tailgate, are completely separate. In fact, I had them "dip-stripped" a month ago and they are just clean metal now (waiting to rust it seems), so I would like to put this planning to the test. To get the "right" color I expect to use this description of Glenwood Green

    Willys
    1958 and 1959 PAINT COLORS
    Service Bulletin No. 416
    March 23,1959

    GLENWOOD GREEN
    Acme No. - Lacquer 1592, Enamel 22-1592
    Ditzler No. - Laquer DAL-42073, Enamel DQE-42073
    Du Pont No. - Lacquer 82822, Enamel 15282
    Rinshed-Mason No. - Lacquer 57W31, Enamel 257W31

    I hope that the local auto paint guys can interpret this to a paint that I can fearlessly use.

    (Paint in hair? Ha, what hair!!)

    Again, thanks for the advise, this site is a jewel.

    My Jeep Site
     
  10. Jan 14, 2005
    Boyink

    Boyink Super Moderator Staff Member Sponsor

    Ava, MO
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    Sep 20, 2002
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    Do what my dad used to...

    Wait till summer..or late spring before the bugs come out..and do a backyard job.

    Much easier than the paint booth approach...
     
  11. Jan 15, 2005
    speedbuggy

    speedbuggy Looking for a Jeep now Sponsor

    Living the Good...
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    If this is your first paint job, I suggest a single stage enamel. Very easy to work with.
     
  12. Jan 15, 2005
    JZ

    JZ Member

    Huntsville...
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    140
    Boyink: In Alabama, the bugs are always out!

    B^)
     
  13. Jan 27, 2005
    kiowamtp

    kiowamtp Member

    DFW
    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2004
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    601
    I am thinking about doing the "home" paint job as well. When I was stationed at Fort Hood, TX they had a paint booth we could rent for merely change. Really nice. I painted my YJ fenders in there after I hit a buzzard doing 65 MPH!! That was my first paint job and my biggest problem was applying the clear coat after doing the base. It was very easy to get runs.

    After reading this thread, my question is "Is there paint that already has the clear coat mixed in so it is just one application." Or is clear coat not used by the majority??
     
  14. Jan 27, 2005
    kiowamtp

    kiowamtp Member

    DFW
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    Dec 24, 2004
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    601
    This is what I just received from the previous owner. I will quote...

    "The frame was sandblasted, primed and painted with regular paint. The POR15 was used on the front and rear ends, transmission, t-case and other chassis parts. The POR15 was not painted over."


    I would prefer not to strip the frame and start over since it was just done. However, I do live in upstate NY and want to make sure the frame is protected adequately from rust. Based on everyones experience here is that enough on the frame, or is there something else I can throw on top of it for added protection or would that be going overboard?

    The POR 15 was not painted over. What is the best paint to use? I was not aware you had to paint over POR 15 as was mentioned in this thread.

    Thanks

    Kevin
     
  15. Jan 27, 2005
    jd7

    jd7 Sponsor Sponsor

    Nacogdoches,Texas
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    I'd go to the por15 website they list products that you can topcoat the frame with
     
  16. Jan 27, 2005
    Boyink

    Boyink Super Moderator Staff Member Sponsor

    Ava, MO
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    According to the company, Straight POR will discolor if exposed to sunlight.

    I topcoated with POR chassis black - it oxidized pretty bad.
     
  17. Jan 27, 2005
    timgr

    timgr Jeepin' Nerd Sponsor 2019 Sponsor

    Medford Mass USA
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    Re the poisonous chemicals, it's not the solvents that are the main problem - it's the hardener. Paint hardeners contain isocyanates, which are poisonous; the effects are cuumulative and irreversible. Once the paint hardens, it's no longer poisonous because the isocyanates have chemically combined with the paint.

    You can find lots of links. Here's one that mentions the health risks: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/asthma.html

    If I were going to spray with hardener, I'd at least use a HEPA filter, full face protection, and cover all my exposed skin. I'd use a HVLP setup to reduce the overspray. I'd also consider who and what is downwind when I'm spraying. Rigging a filtered, pressurized booth seems like an obvious precaution.
     
  18. Jan 27, 2005
    timgr

    timgr Jeepin' Nerd Sponsor 2019 Sponsor

    Medford Mass USA
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    Like Dennis wrote, the alternative to base coat - clear coat is a single stage paint. The best option is probably acrylic enamel with hardener, something like PPG MAE is good. http://www.autocolorlibrary.com/cmg/mae.html
     
  19. Jan 28, 2005
    kcjeep

    kcjeep Member

    Stillwater, Oklahoma
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2003
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    115
    I'm with the others concerning personal protection. I repainted a '49 3A a couple of years back and purchased a professional level respirator from our local paint supply. This one has the removable activated charcoal filters. Sure worth the $$, I did not smell any fumes during the entire painting project.
     
  20. Jan 28, 2005
    blevisay

    blevisay Oh Noooooooooooooooo! Staff Member Sponsor

    Portland Tn.
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    3,565
    Dont use a hepa filter!
    The Hepa is for dust...not chemicals!
    You need activated carbon with a prefilter...............
     

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