Bench Vise

Discussion in 'The Tool Shed' started by Mcruff, Sep 6, 2017.

  1. Sep 6, 2017
    Mcruff

    Mcruff Earlycj5 Machinist Sponsor

    Albertville, AL
    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2002
    Messages:
    4,567
    I picked up this little Columbia vise (3-1/2") at the flea market about 3 months ago for $30. It was in great shape but I decided to clean it up a little and oil blacken the shiny parts. I finally put it back together today. Gonna mount it to the bench tomorrow.

    Bench vise.JPG

    Columbia Vise.JPG
     
    Danefraz, 47v6, Walt Couch and 3 others like this.
  2. Sep 7, 2017
    timgr

    timgr Jeepin' Nerd Sponsor

    Medford Mass USA
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2003
    Messages:
    18,204
    I'd like to find a vise like that. My Craftsman Chinese vise loosens and wobbles... but maybe I should have a press brake so I don't need to bend brackets in the vise.

    Is there a reason you removed the pipe clamp?
     
  3. Sep 7, 2017
    Mcruff

    Mcruff Earlycj5 Machinist Sponsor

    Albertville, AL
    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2002
    Messages:
    4,567
    The pipe vise jaws are removable, there not bolted in only sit in. I have them in a drawer of my toolbox. My big Craftsman has them built in so I don't really use them in the smaller vise. How old is your Craftsman, my Craftsman is American made, about 1989-90 or so.
     
  4. Sep 7, 2017
    Focker

    Focker Rust Never Sleeps Staff Member Sponsor

    Tri-Cities WA
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2014
    Messages:
    4,319
    That's awesome.

    What kind of paint or technique did you use?
     
  5. Sep 7, 2017
    Mcruff

    Mcruff Earlycj5 Machinist Sponsor

    Albertville, AL
    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2002
    Messages:
    4,567
    I sandblasted the the whole vise, its painted with safety red Rustoleum industrial paint, about 3 coats. The jaws and handles are blackened by heating them with a propane torch (about 400*) and then dipping them in used motor oil and then reapplying the heat and burning the motor oil, you do this several times until the surface is blackened from the burnt oil. The oil penetrates the surface and provides a cosmetic and protective coating against rust. This is the way a lot of tools used to be blackened in the old days, Starrett and other tool companies used to do this in the 20's thru the 40's on most of their tools.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2017
    Alan28 and 47v6 like this.
  6. Sep 7, 2017
    Focker

    Focker Rust Never Sleeps Staff Member Sponsor

    Tri-Cities WA
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2014
    Messages:
    4,319
    Thanks for the details. (y)
     
  7. Sep 7, 2017
    timgr

    timgr Jeepin' Nerd Sponsor

    Medford Mass USA
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2003
    Messages:
    18,204
    2007ish. I assume it's Chinese - I bought it for the bench I built when I moved in to the current house.
     
  8. Sep 7, 2017
    Keys5a

    Keys5a Sponsor Sponsor

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2014
    Messages:
    1,098
    I've picked up some old hand tools here and there, and have a couple old Plumb brand box-end wrenches with the blackened oil finish. They have "war finish" stamped on the back side. I like the old stuff sometimes!
    -Donny
     
  9. Sep 7, 2017
    PeteL

    PeteL Member Sponsor

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2003
    Messages:
    5,235
    Purty!
     
  10. Nov 11, 2017
    XJSuperman

    XJSuperman New Member

    Central Iowa
    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2017
    Messages:
    8
    Picked up a Wilton WS5 they were throwing out at work. Called them up and had a piece sent to me on warranty and the vise works great. I wiped it down with oil and greased up the inside and its smooth. It needs a new handle (old one is bent real bad) and a nice solid heavy workbench under it, but Ill get there in time.
     
  11. Nov 11, 2017
    rusty

    rusty Well-Known Member

    norfolk,va
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2006
    Messages:
    1,531
    Nice job. Looks better than new.
     
  12. Nov 11, 2017
    Alan28

    Alan28 Sponsor Sponsor

    Ch√Ętillon en...
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2012
    Messages:
    1,357
    Clean and nice. I use 2 tools like this, coming from my grand-fathers workbench. They are quite old but still working well.
    My grand-fathers were born around 1880. One was working in leather (his parents had a small factory for working shoes, wood+leather) then at the age of 15 he left not happy and came to Paris, he worked in clock manufacturing then specialised in photo. The other one was in the metal work and had various activities, at the end in copper alloy industry.
    I kept some of their tools, some of them which I don't really understand!
     
  13. Nov 11, 2017
    Jeepenstein

    Jeepenstein Me like Jeep.. Sponsor

    Bucksnort, TN
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2003
    Messages:
    1,634
    Every time I find one of those they want $250 for it..
     
  14. Nov 11, 2017
    TuxParkIV

    TuxParkIV New Member

    Charlottesville VA
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2017
    Messages:
    6
    Nice work! Good lesson on the oil and heat.
     

Share This Page

New Posts