Tool Reviews

Discussion in 'The Tool Shed' started by Focker, Jul 15, 2016.

  1. Nov 1, 2017
    tarry99

    tarry99 Member Sponsor

    Northern California
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    3,139
    Hum another crutch......This I guess will help the folks that can't measure things............just wondering , does that tape also do the cutting?
     
  2. Nov 1, 2017
    Focker

    Focker Rust Never Sleeps Staff Member Sponsor

    Tri-Cities WA
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    Just your finger if you let it retract at full force. ;)
     
  3. Nov 11, 2017
    XJSuperman

    XJSuperman New Member

    Central Iowa
    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2017
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    8
    Just read this thread, so Ill briefly try to hit everything in one post. Challenge accepted. Ready, go.

    Welder: Just grabbed a used Miller 135 locally and it has been fantastic. Guess I joined Team Blue in the welding world with this one. 115v, plugs in anywhere, easy enough to pack with me if I want to go to a buddy's garage, and consumables are common and cheap.

    Grinder: the previously discussed Dewalt 4.5" grinders are where its at. I used to run Makita models all day everyday at work, but when the time came for me to buy, Dewalt was there. mine is corded, but it goes right along with the 20v cordless drill and 1/2" 20v compact impact gun from them.

    Dewalt 20v impact gun: No cords, no air hoses, no BS. I used to work for CNH as a combine demonstrator, and we all swore by this impact gun for changing sickle teeth, concaves, and other parts. It changes all my wheels and tires, and goes everywhere with me. I have OBA on my Jeep and I still carry this just because.

    Wrenches: I pickup Snap-On any chance I get when I find a deal, but Craftsman has been good to me as long as I stay away from a Sears store. (I have a personal curse for finding the most idiotic people in a 5 mile radius of me when the time comes I need something done like a warranty). Ace Hardware stocks Craftsman for the moment, and they are just fine. I make a habit of looking for older tools because you can't beat old school tools. New gadgets are fun until the plastic breaks. I don't use "soft handled" tools, I don't need rubber grips on my ratchets, I just stick with the original Craftsman and Snap-On stuff. Williams and BluePoint are both part of Snap-On and are solid as well.

    Toolbox: I grew up around Snap-On toolboxes, and while we all know they are great, they are also expensive. So my next go-to is oddly enough at the opposite end of the spectrum: Harbor Freight. There aren't many things I buy there, and I have a whole set of rules for doing so, but their USGeneral toolboxes are great as long as you can keep the paint on them. They are coated pretty badly, they scrape and scratch easy. But the drawers are better than every new Craftsman (Waterloo) box Ive opened, and the cost is rock bottom. A 20 year old Snap On box of equal size is still twice as much as a HF box.

    flare tool
    : I got lucky enough to get a BluePoint flare kit for nothing awhile back, and aside from not having a 5/8" size, it works flawlessly. Recommend to anyone.

    Air tools: I was spoiled early on with my father's Snap-On and Ingersoll Rand impacts, die grinders, saws, etc. I found a guy selling old used Snap-On impact guns out of a rubbermaid tote a few years ago and I bought one for $8.00. I paid $12 a week later off the Snap-on truck for a grip for it. After a cleaning and running Marvel oil through it, it runs circles around everything I compare it to. At work at the time we had Husky, Harbor Freight, Northern Tool, and Ingersoll Rand impacts, and I let our differential builder use mine for a day, and he cried when I took it home that night. It was better than everything we had available then. I don't use it much, but I do use it, and it does what I need done when something is being stubborn.


    My advice is to skip the store for hand tools, and start scanning flea-markets, garage sales, estate sales, and ebay. I find a lot on Amazon too when I really need it, but you cant beat the bargains of a swap-meet style environment. Good old tools can be found in small piles, in small toolboxes, and in complete sets, but hunting down and piecing together a complete set of wrenches is too much fun for me to turn down and replace by dealing with some clueless soul at Sears or whatever department store carries your brands near you.

    I tried to add images but couldn't get it to do anything but link from a website...
     
    Hellion likes this.
  4. Dec 6, 2017
    timgr

    timgr Jeepin' Nerd Sponsor

    Medford Mass USA
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2003
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    Vise Grip 4LW
    [​IMG]
    IRWIN Tools VISE-GRIP Original Locking Wrench with Wire Cutter (item #8) - Locking Jaw Pliers - Amazon.com

    These saved me a lot of grief when working on the rusty VW brake lines. My S&K metric flare nut wrench rounded the corners, but these removed the nut NP. I probably could have reused the nut if I started with these pliers; oh well. New nuts are a good idea for new lines anyway. A larger set of vise grips would probably work too, but I'm sure they would smash the nut in the process of removal. The head for these pliers looks large, but its shape fits into tight spaces rather well.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 6, 2017
  5. Dec 9, 2017 at 8:20 AM
    PeteL

    PeteL Member Sponsor

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    Aug 3, 2003
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    I'm NOT good at math.

    Just hold the tape at an angle until it reads exact numbers, then mark the number that's in in the middle.:schooled:
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2017 at 7:16 PM
    3b a runnin and Bowbender like this.
  6. Dec 9, 2017 at 1:11 PM
    wheelie

    wheelie beeg dummy Sponsor

    York, PA
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    Mar 6, 2004
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    3,250
    Like that vise grip, Tim. About 10 bucks on a quick search. Maybe I'll find one in my Christmas stocking. Thanks for the tip.
     
  7. Dec 13, 2017 at 8:42 AM
    timgr

    timgr Jeepin' Nerd Sponsor

    Medford Mass USA
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2003
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    Another stocking stuffer -

    etekcity (302 x 301).jpg

    Amazon.com: Etekcity Lasergrip 774 Non-contact Digital Laser Infrared Thermometer Temperature Gun -58℉~ 716℉ (-50℃ ~ 380℃), Yellow and Black: Instant Read Thermometers: Kitchen & Dining

    An infrared laser thermometer. These are extra handy, and very inexpensive. I have this one, and I keep it by my bench. It's also useful in the kitchen, and for moments of curiosity. I bought one for me and my brother on special in 2015, and I think I spent more than the current price.

    We had a thread about multimeters recently, and one of the cost-added features of the more expensive meters is an input for a K-type thermocouple. I would rather have this laser thermometer than the thermocouple input - probably end up less expensive buying this and the cheaper meter.
     
  8. Dec 13, 2017 at 8:49 AM
    PeteL

    PeteL Member Sponsor

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    Aug 3, 2003
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    X2 - Use mine ALL the time, even in the kitchen.
     
  9. Dec 13, 2017 at 8:49 AM
    XJSuperman

    XJSuperman New Member

    Central Iowa
    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2017
    Messages:
    8
    Ive got a Harbor Freight one and its great. They sometimes put big discounts on them so I think I got mine for the same price as that. I will admit though, we spent more time using it to let the dog chase around the house than we do for taking temperatures.
     
  10. Dec 13, 2017 at 11:19 AM
    Focker

    Focker Rust Never Sleeps Staff Member Sponsor

    Tri-Cities WA
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2014
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    I have their keychain sized version. I think it was $10...It works great.
     

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