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Dutch '73 Cj5 Restoration

Discussion in 'Builds and Fabricators Forum' started by Sander, Jul 4, 2017.

  1. Jul 4, 2017
    Sander

    Sander New Member

    Balkbrug, the...
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2011
    Messages:
    12
    Hello,

    My name is Sander and I'm from the Netherlands. A few may have seen my introduction in the introduction page were I shared a few pictures of the cj5 restoration my dad and I are doing. Now it is time to start a thread about the (slow) progress of the restoration.

    Now time for some background on our previous and current Jeeps. Back in the early 90's my dad bought a M38a1 released by the Dutch army. The Jeep addiction started when I was around two years old and considered old enough to join my dad on Jeep adventures.

    The M38a1 got sold in the late 90's in favor of a 1985 Land Rover 90, because it was more suitable to drive every day. Then in 2004 the 90 got traded in for a 1998 Land Rover 130 because the whole family would fit in it. And finally in 2008 (or 2009, I can't remember) the Jeep cj5 came along.

    This particular CJ5 was originally one example of a fleet of Jeeps ordered by the police force of Kuwait. For about 10 years the Jeep was used very hard, when we got it had a lot of stress cracks around the entire body. Around 1987 that whole fleet of Jeeps was imported from Kuwait to the Netherlands. Most of these Jeeps were restored to their former glory. Several attempts were made to restore our Jeep. By past owners a new frame was bought because the old one was rotted beyond repair.

    The Jeep remained unrestored till we got around 2008/2009. When we got the Jeep it was still looking like it came directly from the desert. The engine and transmission were strapped in the back with several other parts. All body panels were beat but fairly rust free due the dry desert climate.

    At first glance the Jeep looked pretty complete. But over the years with growing Jeep restoration experience, we now have the impression that it was more likely a basket case with only value its body, axles and transmission.

    We also got to know the intermediate cj5's and their unobtanium of parts in the Netherlands. But over the years we almost succeeded in finding every missing part of the Jeep.
    So time for some pictures:

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    Here it is on the trailer with the Land Rover 130.

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    These are all pictures when we picked the Jeep up. The Jeep originally has a AMC 232, T14/Dana20 and Dana 30 and 44 axles with 4.27 gears. The original AMC 232 was full with desert sand, so it was repowered with another AMC 232 from a 1969 Jeep Gladiator fire truck, which turned out to be not that straightforward swap.

    At the moment the Jeep runs and drives strong with only the electrical work needing to be done. Also it still needs a title for final registration.
    Below how the Jeep looked 6 months back.
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    In the following days I will post the pictures from then to now.

    Regards, Sander
     
    Bowbender, sterlclan and 1957Willys like this.
  2. Jul 5, 2017
    Sander

    Sander New Member

    Balkbrug, the...
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2011
    Messages:
    12
    When we got the Jeep home, the first that we did was looking at the engine. The cylinderwalls were pretty grooved, therefore a rebuild was needed.
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    The cylinder head was full of desert sand, also we found numerous valves were leaking.
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    Luckily a colleague of my dad was driving a 1980 something cj5 with an AMC 258 engine. The engine had bad knock in it. But this engine came from a running vehicle so all the engine parts were there en we did not have to buy those. The reason for that he was selling the engine was because he was going to swap the engine for a six-cylinder from a Pontiac Le Mans. So now we had our engine.
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    Then when we thought we were going to use the 258 an add popped up with a 1969 AMC 232 for sale. This add caught our attention because it came from a Jeep Gladiator firetruck from Switserland with a mileage of around 30.000 miles. The guy was selling the engine because he wanted a v8. The best thing about this engine is that was from 1969 which means that it was not detuned to pass the emission requirements. Also it has a nice steel valve cover instead of the plastic one on the 258. After the clean up we painted it in a nice blue colour, although that was not a bright idea because we did it in wintertime in our really small garage resulting in sore eyes and blue spit:D

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    The transmission was also coverd in grease and desert sand, which in this case was a good thing because it was so thick that hardly any moisture could get in it, so the internals were still in pretty good shape.
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    This is what I mean with greasy:
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    Then we had our first really major set back. We thought when we bougth the 69 232 it would probaly be the same as a 73, which turned out to be that it wasn't. The 69 engine block has a different casting because a different transmission is mounted behind it. This resulted that for the 69 the bellhouse mounts were shorter (or the otherway around, I can't remember). This was fixed by making a new transmission plate that of around 10mm thick, where the holes for the 73 T14 bellhousing were drilled in. Also the hole where you mount the flywheel of the 69 were not as deep as the ones from the 73 engine. This was because the flywheel of the 69 had a larger thickness in the middle than compared with the 73. By using shorter bolts were eliminated this problem.

    To this day we are still very happy with the 69 232. The 30.000 supposedly miles are in our opinion true. It fires right up and has even a little bit more power than a standard 73 example.
    :beer:
     
    Scott G. likes this.
  3. Jul 5, 2017
    Focker

    Focker That's a terrible idea...What time? Staff Member 2019 Sponsor

    Tri-Cities WA
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2014
    Messages:
    6,947
    Wow... That's a lot of grease and sand. Looks like you have a good handle on things.

    Thanks for sharing.
     
  4. Jul 9, 2017
    Sander

    Sander New Member

    Balkbrug, the...
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2011
    Messages:
    12
    The gastank was unfortunately leaking due to tiny rust holes, but not as bad as the tank skidplate which was completely rusted out. Because my dad works at a factory where they construct fiberglass piping, the gas tank got sealed and repaired with the use of fiberglass and a heavy duty glue. This may not sound as a good solution, but the tank is still holding gas and we haven't had a clocked fuel filter.
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    The axles were painted and the breaks were rebuilt. We were missing an 11' drum but when picking up the new engine it turned out that the guy also had a drum laying around.
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    And here is the chassis ready to go.
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    Above is the rolling chassis with the engine which took us quitte some time. Because we bought the jeep incomplete there were several parts missing.
    And of course these parts had to be the most hard to find 72-75 model year only parts:mad:. Things like the steering box and bellcrank bracket were all missing. Actually when I think about it alot of brackets did not come with the jeep. But after several years we found almost every bracket. And at this point we fabricated our new brackets when we could not find one.
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  5. Jul 9, 2017
    Sander

    Sander New Member

    Balkbrug, the...
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2011
    Messages:
    12
    After fully building up the chassis, the body needed attention. Because the body came from the desert it was mostly rustfree. Even the floor were still pretty solid. But it still had the standard jeep rust at the rear panels. The jeep then was painted with primer to protect it for the rainy Dutch weather.
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    Scott G. likes this.

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